News Why parking prangs and door dings are causing chaos this Christmas

Why parking prangs and door dings are causing chaos this Christmas

28.11.2016

The latest figures released from accident aftercare specialist Accident Exchange, have revealed that over the past 12 months British motorists have spent £1.4 million rectifying damage to their vehicles caused whilst simply parking their car. These low-speed parking accidents account for over 30% of the claims recorded by Accident Exchange, and it is estimated that there are 675,000 parking accidents ever year. That’s 1,849 a day! So why does it seem, that Britain are finding it so difficult to park their cars?

The answer is - modern day cars are now too big for the recommended parking bay size. Or should that be, parking bay sizes are now too small for the modern day car...?

The government recommend that parking spaces in the UK should be 2.4m wide by 4.8m long; however, cars such as the Audi Q7 measure more than 5m in length, exceeding the average parking bay size. Some models measure over 2 metres in width, assuming a car parks either side of them, the driver and their passengers would have less than 20cm each side to squeeze out of the car. And it’s not just Britain’s love affair with 4x4 and SUV’s that is causing the rise in parking accidents. The Vauxhall Corsa, a model that some would previously consider a smaller car, is significantly larger than in previous years and has expanded in size by 16% in the past 15 years.

Accident Exchange found that 87% of UK councils abide by these parking bay size guidelines set out by the government, ignoring the obvious increase in size of new car models. As parking spaces haven’t increased in size for a very long time, is it finally time to admit that these guidelines are no longer relevant to the modern day car? With the added struggle of pillars and ramps in most multi-storey car parks and as we approach the busy Christmas shopping period, some may be asking themselves is it simply easier (and safer!) to stay at home?